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magazine" the latest from david ignatius of the "washington post," tom ricks of "foreign policy," and state department correspondent margaret brennan. we'll round it up on the with amy walt are aim amy walter, michael gerson, and our political director john dickerson. from out in space to here on earth, this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning, again on a day when there is no shortage of questions. we welcome dennis mcdonough president obama's me chief of staff, who i presume has brought many answers with him this morning. nice to have you. >> thanks for having me, bob. i'm really looking forward to it. >> schieffer: the sequester these draconian across-the-board spending cuts that are supposed to go into effect march 1. it appears to me that this is anything to happen. it looks to as if both the president and the congressional leaders have given up on each other. can this possibly happen? >> well, we've not give know up on this, bob and the reason we've not given up on this is be
policy front, some of the best foreign policy reporters in the business. david ignatius is with the "washington post," of course. tom ricks used to work for the "poat" is now contributing editor to "foreign policy" magazine and margaret brennan is our cbs news state department correspondent. before we get to foreign subjects here on earth, i want to talk about matters from outer space, and that meteorite that fell over siberia and injured over 1,000 people. so we're going back to new york to talk with the science editor and senior editor of "time" magazine jeffrey chewinger. jeffrey, let me start with the obvious. this thing caught our attention. there's no question about that. should we be worried about this? do these things pose a danger to those of us here on earth? >> well, they do and they don't. there's some comfort to be takenarchs we report in "time" magazine this week, that the earth has been playing in traffic for about 4 billion years now especially the time calmed the heavy bombardment period when the solar system hadn't quite acreeded yet. even today, every
with republicans wanting to flex their muscle on foreign policy. they haven't had many victories in terms of a lot of foreign policy, a lot of their policies have been discreditted by what we have seen over the last years in terms of the prosecution of the war on terror. so i think that's it. but i also think obama didn't do himself any favors by picking hagel. in some ways he's the only guy that wants hagel. democrats are not that excited about having hagel there. republicans are not happy. they want to drag it out. chris: what are you hearing from your reporters? >> i think that's right. the sense is he will be confirmed but there's still more time so we don't know what could happen. something new could come out. >> absolutely. >> change. chris: i think there may be a brilliant strategy. slow it down, slow it down, hope something breaks. bad news comes out of the woodwork. let's talk about something coming up on the subject of the march 1 showdown known as sequester. you wrote your new e-book called "here's the deal" in part, quote, democrats have gone on record as accepting a much longer list o
through a list of other issues from energy to manufacturing, touched on foreign policy and at the end reached, i think it's fair to say, an emotional crescendo when he talked about gun violence in america and recognized a number of individuals there in the house chamber who have been touched by gun violence. either they're the survivors, surviving family members or who themselves have been victims of gun violence. mark, we were counting, i think, as he went through... i know i made some notes. almost a dozen new initiatives the president announced on everything from international trade to higher education to doing something about the voting experience in america. it seemed like the president was trying to inject some energy into his second term. >> i agree wu, judy. i just want to underline the emotional apex of the evening was undoubtedly the "deserve a vote" chant that the president led when he spoke on gun control and the need, making the argument that our police departments were outgunned by those with assault weapons with criminal intent. and i thought that a speech that quite fr
. "state of the union" address tonight and foreign policy will not be the focus of the "state of the union" address, probably, but it will come up. tonight the president is dealing with the first major foreign policy crisis of the second term. north korea has conducted a third nuclear test. with the apparent goal of obtaining a warhead that could threaten the u.s. chief washington correspondent james rosen at the state department on today's test. >> the test was conducted in a safe and perfect way, on a high level with the use of a smaller and light a-bomb, unlike priest ones, yet with great explosion i power. all that and the alarming claim of min neurodevice that couldn't confirmed appeared to be true. in an emergency morning session, the-up security council went through what the u.n. ambassador susan rice called the usual drill. >> we and others have a number of further measures we will be discussing with the council members in various spheres that will not only tighten the existing measures but we aim to augment the sanctions regime that is quite strong, as implemented in 1874 and 208
foreign policy record. which is worse? >> i tell you one thing, i think boehner has his own internal problems and that he shouldn't run out there and get in the president's way because in doing that he's getting in the american people's way. i think it's time that people want to see us go above party and think in terms of our country. i think they're exhausted at the partisan politics and now is the time to rembuild america and moe forward. >> i thought it was speaker bain mother didn't have the guts to do a grand bargain deal with the president because he was frightened of eric cantor in 2011. now he's saying it's the president who doesn't have the guts. i mean, this is total revisionism, isn't it? >> well, you can see that boehner wants everyone to respond to the president, the tea party, the republican party. if there was a moderate part of the republican party, i guess there will be a chance to respond, too. i don't really think that boehner is speaking for the american people or the republicans for that matter. i think that he is trying to keep these primaries -- tea party prima
of the last decade. at the moment, few americans spontaneously mentioned foreign policy, or specifically the wars in afghanistan, conflicts in the middle east, or even things like nuclear weapons in korea. anything having to do with foreign policy or overseas activity is not top of mind for the average american at this point. we just measured obama on approval rating. his number one issue was national defence. it is a strength for this president. he is perceived as doing well on that part of his portfolio. but it is not a party for americans. host: very interesting information. the c-span audience is getting a first look at it with you. thank you for giving us a preview on america's most important problems, as we look at the state of the union address. thanks so much. we are going to go back to our phone calls, asking you the same question. what is taught on your mind, in problems facing the country? aha caller: -- ♪ caller: a relief of the president stresses the importance of both sides putting aside their own political interests in the sake of moving the country forward. there are wa
and unemployment, he is completely wrong or during the hearings when he was talking about foreign policy. he sounded like he had no idea how these things actually work even though the words sounded very lovely all mixed together like that. >> rick, i think part of that maybe perhaps is that you can't actually tie yourself to specific policy in the current republican party. i mean, the thing about -- the difference between barack obama and hillary clinton is that they really weren't that far apart in terms of actual policy. there were a few measurable differences that were -- a lot of hay was made out of them, but fundamentally it wasn't that the democratic party was going through the same sort of, you know, analysis on the couch that the republican party is. >> the point is the strategy on how each one of them sort of had this crescendo in their popularity. it wasn't -- i'm not speaking to the two, but when hillary was first in the senate, she was very careful and methodical about how she rolled herself out. same thing with barack obama. knew that he came in as a big star, but knew that he n
a speech done now for days to react to the events of overnight? >> usually they have a foreign policy section and i think they'll add it. and, you know, usually they find a way to work in foreign policy and go in that section and it's -- you know, these speeches are, you know, the structure of them is done a long time in advance but they'll still being worked on until the last minute. >> absolutely. and also, we know through the latest developments today, the president will announce 34,000 troops leaving afghanistan, as well. another part of the puzzle if you will of us learning when's in that speech. what i'm curious about your opinion on, our first read team says there are three economic questions that the president will perhaps answer tonight. one of them is how can the united states create more jobs at home. when the speech outline is happening, are you guys talking about these are the questions people are asking at home. mr. president, this is how to answer. is it that kind of set-up? >> well, you know, usually you start out i think by, you know, the president and his speechwrite
announced him as his pick, mcdonough has been involved in every major foreign policy decision including the call to get osama bin laden. >> i thought dennis likes to pull all-nighters. the truth is nobody outworks denis mcdonough. >> here he is. mr. mcdonough, welcome to "meet the press." >> thanks for having me. >> this is a tough job. you are the fourth one to have it. what is your key part of your goal for this job. as the president has a narrow window. how do you approach it? >> my approach is focus on something that jim baker told me the other day. reach out to several of the other chiefs of staff. he said as long as you're focused and not on chief, you're going to be okay. i got to tell you i'm working with a staff that is excellent. i'm really honored to be part of it. i'm honored that the president has laid this responsibility on me and i look forward to doing it. >> i was mentioning before we went on the hit. the asteroid that came near the united states is stuff you have to talk about. >> it is tough that we have to talk about and do talk about and we have had a lot of back an
donough to be his foreign policy adviser to the campaign. the president announced him as his pick, mcdonough involved in every major foreign policy decision, including the call to get osama bin laden. >> i actually begun to think that denis likes pulling all-nighters. the truth is nobody outworks denis mcdonough. >> here he is. mr. mcdonough, welcome to "meet the press." >> thanks so much for having me, david. >> this is a tough job. you're the fourth one to have it. what is the key, part of your goal for this job as the president has a narrow window? how do you approach it? >> my approach is to focus on something jim baker told me just the other day, actually. reach out to several of the other chiefs of staff in the past and he said as long as you you focused on the staff and not on the chief, you are going to be okay. i'm working with a staff that is excellent. i'm real honored the president has laid this responsibility to me and i look forward to doing it. >> from the expected to unexpected. i was mentioning before we went on the air. the asteroid that came near the united states.
of other issues from energy to manufacturing, touched on foreign policy and at the end reached, i think it's fair to say, an emotional crescendo when he talked about gun violence in america and recognized a number of individuals there in the house chamber who have been touched by gun violence. either they're the survivors, surviving family members or who themselves have been victims of gun violence. mark, we were counting, i think, as he went through... i know i made some notes. almost a dozen new initiatives the president announced on everything from international trade to higher education to doing something about the voting experience in america. it seemed like the president was trying to inject some energy into his second term. >> i agree wu, judy. i just want to underline the emotional apex of the evening was undoubtedly the "deserve a vote" chant that the president led when he spoke on gun control and the need, making the argument that our police departments were outgunned by those with assault weapons with criminal intent. and i thought that a speech that quite frankly lacked a lot o
that they have questions about some foreign policy decisions he has made in the past. i think particularly senator cruz and others went too far in applying as a consquence that somehow he is dangerous to the united states. he won the election to decide who wants to be secretary of defense. >> what do you think was behind a lot of that? >> i think it had a lot to do with a sort of neoconservative movement who are very angry to senator hagel about the surge and critical comments he made and has to do with a number of conservative jewish americans who are concerned about his jews on israel. i think they came together and made a hot political issue with it. i am pleased that they will not hold the nomination up because we don't have a secretary of defense right now. it is a very bad impression to filibuster a nominee for secretary of defense because you disagree with his foreign policy conclusions. >> the administration's policy on drone attacks on suspected terrorists has been under a great deal of scrutiny. now there is new attention on the use of drones domestically. this is the hill report
, had choice words for the president's foreign policy team. i'm not sure i agree with that. in "the new york times," a great must-read, quietly killing a consumer watchdog. it's how the republicans are just doing everything they can not to have the consumer financial protection bureau that was created by elizabeth warren under president obama actually function because it would keep them, quite frankly, from being able to get their money from all their donors on wall street. and they do not want to lose the people who helped them out. so they want to make sure that the consumer suffers so that they can gain politically. it's a good one. take a look at it. coming up -- >> we're also going to talk about nancy pelosi saying we don't have a spending problem, and the problem with medicare is not medicare. we've got a lot to talk about straight ahead. >> gail collins of "the new york times" joins us straight ahead. >> she's got a great column. >> i love it. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely,
the administration and crank can do together. yes, there will be things about foreign policies, gun control infrastructure clean energy. but the white house has gone far and beyond than in previous speeches where the president is going to be speaking directly to the american people without the filter of washington reporters and pundits. secondly the white house has been talking a lot about making republicans own the cuts in spending, the sequester. when you hear the white house say repeatedly, a lot of speech is going to be focused on the economy, and the president is going to argue that $85 billion in spending cuts could wreck the economy, and it's the republicans' responsibility to help avoid that. this comes across as a much more partisan speech. a lot of people were anticipating just a few weeks ago. >> michael: let's talk about the partisanship of the speech. we heard that inauguration speech. how do you think--that was partisan in a lot of people's minds. i didn't see it as partisan. i sort of saw it as progressive and forward-thinking. but when you think about what the president is g
: the president has two big foreign policies issues he needs to tackle tonight including one we just learned about this morning. can you fill us in on what to expect? >> you can expect some reference to north korea, but don't look for anything new or anything that is going to upset the apple cart as far as the administration believes that as far as north korea is concerned there is sufficient pressure to contain the north korea from the japanese and particularly the chinese in the region. don't look for any new policy from the president on that. afghanistan, this is the president's battle to the pentagon, he's going to pull troops out of afghanistan at a faster pace than his military advisers suggested. he's looking to cut the force in half by 2013. that is quicker than the pentagon officials said they thought would be prudent. >> john: wow, a visit 13-year war. the president is expected to call for compromise and reach common ground but isn't he using congress as a background while talking beyond them and asking voters to pressure congressmen into giving what he wants? isn't that how they perceiv
political thought when it comes to foreign policy. i think that's fair too. so i think that's what the senate is supposed to do. they're supposed to advise and consent. i think john mccain is doing it exactly like he should do it. he has problems with it, but he's going to let the president put his person in charge. i thought mccain was very fair there. mark? you take some of the things he said in the past, they're pretty bad, but he circled back. he's talked to lindsey. he's assured some other people that those are not his positions today. >> senator hagel has really big shoes to fill. the president's first two defense secretaries, fantastic. worked well with the hill, worked well with the pentagon. i think senator mccain, unlike some of the other critics that chuck hagel, has focused on the things where there really are questions. >> and by the way, again, i support chuck hagel. but they're very legitimate questions. we have to sort out some of the hyperbolic attacks, which are just shameful, versus responsible concerns. john mccain, i felt, was really responsible yesterday, took
of the union address, but a nuclear test from a growing threat overseas has foreign policy back in the spotlight. joining me now for our daily fix, chris calizza, managing editor of post politics.com, and mike allen, politico's chief white house correspondent. welcome both, chris. the timing of this -- in terms of the -- what north korea might be doing. we've got the south korean inaugural coming up february 25th. the state of the union tonight. the president still will speak tonight about north korea. his focus is on the economy and his outline for the budget plans. >> first of all, i generally believe certainly in domestic politics that in terms of teaming and that's probably true. we expabded it to the global state. i will say senior advisor to the president earlier today said, look, north korea was going to be in this speech anyway. yes, the president will address it. you're right. ultimately this is a speech that is focused on the economy. the president has gone a little bit wayward. i think of his own choosing to talk about immigration, gun rights. in some ways the gun rig
're going to do that unless there is a political or a foreign policy reason for them not to do it. >> i mean there's been the questions about responding to sanctions. i mean even today people are wondering, is it tied to state of the union. is it sort of a direct, you know, push against the u.s.? >> i don't think so. i mean, in 2009 we heard this exact same thing. it was a condemnation of their april 2009 missile launch. the north koreans six weeks later conducted a second nuclear test in which they said it was because of the condemnation that occurred over their missile tests. you know, the response to that is that's nonsense. nobody conducts nuclear tests because they've been chastised over a missile test. more specifically, i would say if you're looking at a concurrence of time, it's not the state of the union. it's the two weeks prior to the inauguration of a new south korean president. >> brown: to another part of the world. we'll get back to that. let me ask james acton, the north korean official news agency referred to this as a miniaturized and lighter nuclear device with greater exp
. >> i don't know. >> when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam. were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the-- >> can you answer the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong that's a pretty straight forward question, i'd like the answer whether you're right or wrong and they are you're free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. >> what do you think that the iranian foreign ministry so strongly supports your nomination to be secretary of defense? defense? >> i have a difficult enough time with american politics and senator, i have no idea. >> do you think it's appropriate for the chief civilian leader of the u.s. military forces to agree with the statement that both the perception, quote, and the reality is that the united states is, quote, the world's bully? >> i didn't hear her say that, by the way, united states and i think my comment was it's irrelevant in good observation. i don't think i said that i agree. >> sean: jay sekulow, your reaction? >>
achieve or how the talks would be successful. there seemed to be me a lot of that. on foreign policy, that was not really the focus of the speech he talked about the range of capabilities we will employ in pursuing terrorists abroad, a vague reference to drones and framework he has created to permit to us go after terrorists in way that is lawful. that is probably met with some skepticism in the chamber as well. >> chris: he did mention north korea. they launched a nuclear device, they tested a nuclear device last night. the president said provocations we saw last night will only isolate them further as we strengthen our own missile defense in spochx to these threats. he didn't say much more. quite frankly he can't do much more than that given the fact, unless you go to the war with north korea we can't i am poets any more sanctions. inquiry sanctioned out to take reprice wills there. >> and one of the few times both sides of chamber rose in unison was when the president said pledge to stand by israel and its security. he would keep the pressure up on the syrian regime that is murder
-interventionist policy. doesn't like to get too deeply involved into the foreign policies of other countries. it doesn't want too many more sanctions on north korea, as north korea has already sort of sanctioned out, for fear that north korea could collapse into anarchy and you'd have refugees flowing over the border. so, yes, this is a challenge for the neighbors. but this is really a message for the united states. you remember last year, north korea tried to launch a satellite into space, and i was in north korea at the time. it went up for about 90 seconds and then blew up. everyone knew at the time, including intelligence officials, that north korea would try again, and that once they got a successful missile launch, they would probably have a nuclear test. because combined, it's very powerful. now, u.s. intelligence officials have told me that north korea right now has probably a dozen to, at the most, several dozen weapons-deliverable nuclear devices. this is a serious challenge for the obama administration. something he's going to have to address tonight. >> and we are told he will talk about t
foreign policy guru here, head of the ploughshares fund to talk about president obama's expected announcement tonight. he will cut our nuclear arsenal drastically from 1700 down to 1,000. it is tuesday. igor volsky will be here from think progress. but first... >> announcer: this is the "full court press." >> on this tuesday, other headlines making news, solid ratings for the grammy awards on cbs sunday night. the broadcast saw its second highest viewership. 28 and a half million people tuned in to watch but no match for last year's show which came a day after whitney houston's death. nearly 40 million tuned in to that show. this year's musical broadcast beat both the "american idol" finale and last country's country music association awards. >> bill: they're getting better and better. >> pepsi is releasing a new beverage for mornings called kick start. it is a fruit-flavored mountain dew beverage coming in orange, citrus and fruit punch flavors. it is flaved with real fruit juice, mixed with mountain dew. it has more caffeine than a regular mountain dew but far less than a starb
will be back home by this time yex neanext year. it is a big foreign policy to be made, it's expected to be largely about economic issues and the middle class. >> what do you think, is it going to be partisan or more of an olive branch? >> i don't think it will be either, if i can be so bold as to take something that you're not offering a choice that you're not offering. >> you may take it as always. >> i think he will be assertive. i think he will not perceive, he and the white house will not perceive what he's saying as overtly confrontational. i'm sure it will be interpreted that way. i don't anticipate a big olive branch of a speech. he'll talk about common sense measures republicans have supported in the past and stlu as bipartisan. >> the agenda on immigration, gun control, climate by definition, pre-stage conflict with republicans who are ambivalent at best about moving forward on anything. on the other hand, on the big issue of the debt and deficit, since the summer of 2011 he has signaled that he is willing to make a big deal, including some elements, maybe less than two year
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)

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